Ike-scan help output

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Below is the output from ike-scan --help, which gives a brief description of the command line arguments and the available options.

You can obtain exactly the same output by running ike-scan --help. Also, the arguments and options are documented in the Unix manual page ike-scan.1, which is included in the source distribution.

$ ike-scan --help
Usage: ike-scan [options] [hosts...]

Target hosts must be specified on the command line unless the --file option is
given, in which case the targets are read from the specified file instead.

The target hosts can be specified as IP addresses or hostnames.  You can also
specify IPnetwork/bits (e.g. 192.168.1.0/24) to specify all hosts in the given
network (network and broadcast addresses included), and IPstart-IPend
(e.g. 192.168.1.3-192.168.1.27) to specify all hosts in the inclusive range.

These different options for specifying target hosts may be used both on the
command line, and also in the file specified with the --file option.

In the options below a letter or word in angle brackets like <f> denotes a
value or string that should be supplied. The corresponding text should
indicate the meaning of this value or string. When supplying the value or
string, do not include the angle brackets. Text in square brackets like [<f>]
mean that the enclosed text is optional. This is used for options which take
an optional argument.

Options:

--help or -h            Display this usage message and exit.

--file=<fn> or -f <fn>  Read hostnames or addresses from the specified file
                        instead of from the command line. One name or IP
                        address per line.  Use "-" for standard input.

--sport=<p> or -s <p>   Set UDP source port to <p>, default=500, 0=random.
                        Some IKE implementations require the client to use
                        UDP source port 500 and will not talk to other ports.
                        Note that superuser privileges are normally required
                        to use non-zero source ports below 1024.  Also only
                        one process on a system may bind to a given source port
                        at any one time. Use of the --nat-t option changes
                        the default source port to 4500

--dport=<p> or -d <p>   Set UDP destination port to <p>, default=500.
                        UDP port 500 is the assigned port number for ISAKMP
                        and this is the port used by most if not all IKE
                        implementations. Use of the --nat-t option changes
                        the default destination port to 4500

--retry=<n> or -r <n>   Set total number of attempts per host to <n>,
                        default=3.

--timeout=<n> or -t <n> Set initial per host timeout to <n> ms, default=500.
                        This timeout is for the first packet sent to each host.
                        subsequent timeouts are multiplied by the backoff
                        factor which is set with --backoff.

--bandwidth=<n> or -B <n> Set desired outbound bandwidth to <n>, default=56000
                        The value is in bits per second by default.  If you
                        append "K" to the value, then the units are kilobits
                        per second; and if you append "M" to the value,
                        the units are megabits per second.
                        The "K" and "M" suffixes represent the decimal, not
                        binary, multiples.  So 64K is 64000, not 65536.

--interval=<n> or -i <n> Set minimum packet interval to <n> ms.
                        The packet interval will be no smaller than this number.
                        The interval specified is in milliseconds by default.
                        if "u" is appended to the value, then the interval
                        is in microseconds, and if "s" is appended, the
                        interval is in seconds.
                        If you want to use up to a given bandwidth, then it is
                        easier to use the --bandwidth option instead.
                        You cannot specify both --interval and --bandwidth
                        because they are just different ways to change the
                        same underlying variable.

--backoff=<b> or -b <b> Set timeout backoff factor to <b>, default=1.50.
                        The per-host timeout is multiplied by this factor
                        after each timeout.  So, if the number of retries
                        is 3, the initial per-host timeout is 500ms and the
                        backoff factor is 1.5, then the first timeout will be
                        500ms, the second 750ms and the third 1125ms.

--verbose or -v         Display verbose progress messages.
                        Use more than once for greater effect:
                        1 - Show when each pass is completed and when
                            packets with invalid cookies are received.
                        2 - Show each packet sent and received and when
                            hosts are removed from the list.
                        3 - Display the host, Vendor ID and backoff lists
                            before scanning starts.

--quiet or -q           Don't decode the returned packet.
                        This prints less protocol information so the
                        output lines are shorter.

--multiline or -M       Split the payload decode across multiple lines.
                        With this option, the decode for each payload is
                        printed on a separate line starting with a TAB.
                        This option makes the output easier to read, especially
                        when there are many payloads.

--lifetime=<s> or -l <s> Set IKE lifetime to <s> seconds, default=28800.
                        RFC 2407 specifies 28800 as the default, but some
                        implementations may require different values.
                        If you specify this as a a decimal integer, e.g.
                        86400, then the attribute will use a 4-byte value.
                        If you specify it as a hex number, e.g. 0xFF, then
                        the attribute will use the appropriate size value
                        (one byte for this example).
                        If you specify the string "none" then no lifetime
                        attribute will be added at all.
                        You can use this option more than once in conjunction
                        with the --trans options to produce multiple transform
                        payloads with different lifetimes.  Each --trans option
                        will use the previously specified lifetime value.

--lifesize=<s> or -z <s> Set IKE lifesize to <s> Kilobytes, default=0.
                        If you specify this as a a decimal integer, e.g.
                        86400, then the attribute will use a 4-byte value.
                        If you specify it as a hex number, e.g. 0xFF, then
                        the attribute will use the appropriate size value
                        (one byte for this example).
                        You can use this option more than once in conjunction
                        with the --trans options to produce multiple transform
                        payloads with different lifesizes.  Each --trans option
                        will use the previously specified lifesize value.

--auth=<n> or -m <n>    Set auth. method to <n>, default=1 (PSK).
                        RFC defined values are 1 to 5.  See RFC 2409 Appendix A.
                        Checkpoint hybrid mode is 64221.
                        GSS (Windows "Kerberos") is 65001.
                        XAUTH uses 65001 to 65010.
                        This is not applicable to IKEv2.

--version or -V         Display program version and exit.

--vendor=<v> or -e <v>  Set vendor id string to hex value <v>.
                        You can use this option more than once to send
                        multiple vendor ID payloads.

--trans=<t> or -a <t>   Use custom transform <t> instead of default set.
                        You can use this option more than once to send
                        an arbitrary number of custom transforms.
                        There are two ways to specify the transform:
                        The new way, where you specify the attribute/value
                        pairs, and the old way where you specify the values
                        for a fixed list of attributes.
                        For the new method, the transform <t> is specified as
                        (attr=value, attr=value, ...)
                        Where "attr" is the attribute number, and "value" is
                        the value to assign to that attribute.  You can specify
                        an arbitary number of attribute/value pairs.
                        See RFC 2409 Appendix A for details of the attributes
                        and values.
                        Note that brackets are special to some shells, so you
                        may need to quote them, e.g.
                        --trans="(1=1,2=2,3=3,4=4)". For example,
                        --trans=(1=1,2=2,3=1,4=2) specifies
                        Enc=3DES-CBC, Hash=SHA1, Auth=shared key, DH Group=2;
                        and --trans=(1=7,14=128,2=1,3=3,4=5) specifies
                        Enc=AES/128, Hash=MD5, Auth=RSA sig, DH Group=5.
                        For the old method, the transform <t> is specified as
                        enc[/len],hash,auth,group.
                        Where enc is the encryption algorithm,
                        len is the key length for variable length ciphers,
                        hash is the hash algorithm, and group is the DH Group.
                        For example, --trans=5,2,1,2 specifies
                        Enc=3DES-CBC, Hash=SHA1, Auth=shared key, DH Group=2;
                        and --trans=7/256,1,1,5 specifies
                        Enc=AES-256, Hash=MD5, Auth=shared key, DH Group=5.
                        This option is not yet supported for IKEv2.

--showbackoff[=<n>] or -o[<n>]  Display the backoff fingerprint table.
                        Display the backoff table to fingerprint the IKE
                        implementation on the remote hosts.
                        The optional argument specifies time to wait in seconds
                        after receiving the last packet, default=60.
                        If you are using the short form of the option (-o)
                        then the value must immediately follow the option
                        letter with no spaces, e.g. -o25 not -o 25.

--fuzz=<n> or -u <n>    Set pattern matching fuzz to <n> ms, default=500.
                        This sets the maximum acceptable difference between
                        the observed backoff times and the reference times in
                        the backoff patterns file.  Larger values allow for
                        higher variance but also increase the risk of
                        false positive identifications.
                        Any per-pattern-entry fuzz specifications in the
                        patterns file will override the value set here.

--patterns=<f> or -p <f> Use IKE backoff patterns file <f>,
                        default=/usr/local/share/ike-scan/ike-backoff-patterns.
                        This specifies the name of the file containing
                        IKE backoff patterns.  This file is only used when
                        --showbackoff is specified.

--vidpatterns=<f> or -I <f> Use Vendor ID patterns file <f>,
                        default=/usr/local/share/ike-scan/ike-vendor-ids.
                        This specifies the name of the file containing
                        Vendor ID patterns.  These patterns are used for
                        Vendor ID fingerprinting.

--aggressive or -A      Use IKE Aggressive Mode (The default is Main Mode)
                        If you specify --aggressive, then you may also
                        specify --dhgroup, --id and --idtype.  If you use
                        custom transforms with aggressive mode with the --trans
                        option, note that all transforms should have the same
                        DH Group and this should match the group specified
                        with --dhgroup or the default if --dhgroup is not used.

--id=<id> or -n <id>    Use <id> as the identification value.
                        This option is only applicable to Aggressive Mode.
                        <id> can be specified as a string, e.g. --id=test or as
                        a hex value with a leading "0x", e.g. --id=0xdeadbeef.

--idtype=<n> or -y <n>  Use identification type <n>.  Default 3 (ID_USER_FQDN).
                        This option is only applicable to Aggressive Mode.
                        See RFC 2407 4.6.2 for details of Identification types.

--dhgroup=<n> or -g <n> Use Diffie Hellman Group <n>.  Default 2.
                        This option is only applicable to Aggressive Mode and
                        IKEv2.  For both of these, it is used to determine the
                        size of the key exchange payload.
                        If you use Aggressive Mode with custom transforms, then
                        you will normally need to use the --dhgroup option
                        unless you are using the default DH group.
                        Acceptable values are 1,2,5,14,15,16,17,18 (MODP only).

--gssid=<n> or -G <n>   Use GSS ID <n> where <n> is a hex string.
                        This uses transform attribute type 16384 as specified
                        in draft-ietf-ipsec-isakmp-gss-auth-07.txt, although
                        Windows-2000 has been observed to use 32001 as well.
                        For Windows 2000, you'll need to use --auth=65001 to
                        specify Kerberos (GSS) authentication.

--random or -R          Randomise the host list.
                        This option randomises the order of the hosts in the
                        host list, so the IKE probes are sent to the hosts in
                        a random order.  It uses the Knuth shuffle algorithm.

--tcp[=<n>] or -T[<n>]  Use TCP transport instead of UDP.
                        This allows you to test a host running IKE over TCP.
                        You won't normally need this option because the vast
                        majority of IPsec systems only support IKE over UDP.
                        The optional value <n> specifies the type of IKE over
                        TCP.  There are currently two possible values:
                        1 = RAW IKE over TCP as used by Checkpoint (default);
                        2 = Encapsulated IKE over TCP as used by Cisco.
                        If you are using the short form of the option (-T)
                        then the value must immediately follow the option
                        letter with no spaces, e.g. -T2 not -T 2.
                        You can only specify a single target host if you use
                        this option.

--tcptimeout=<n> or -O <n> Set TCP connect timeout to <n> seconds (default=10).
                        This is only applicable to TCP transport mode.

--pskcrack[=<f>] or -P[<f>] Crack aggressive mode pre-shared keys.
                        This option outputs the aggressive mode pre-shared key
                        (PSK) parameters for offline cracking using the
                        "psk-crack" program that is supplied with ike-scan.
                        You can optionally specify a filename, <f>, to write
                        the PSK parameters to.  If you do not specify a filename
                        then the PSK parameters are written to standard output.
                        If you are using the short form of the option (-P)
                        then the value must immediately follow the option
                        letter with no spaces, e.g. -Pfile not -P file.
                        You can only specify a single target host if you use
                        this option.
                        This option is only applicable to IKE aggressive mode.

--nodns or -N           Do not use DNS to resolve names.
                        If you use this option, then all hosts must be
                        specified as IP addresses.

--noncelen=<n> or -c <n> Set the nonce length to <n> bytes. Default=20
                        This option controls the length of the nonce payload
                        that is sent in an aggressive mode or IKEv2 request.
                        Normally there is no need to use this option unless you
                        want to reduce the nonce size to speed up pre-shared
                        key cracking, or if you want to see how a particular
                        server handles different length nonce payloads.
                        RFC 2409 states that the length of nonce payload
                        must be between 8 and 256 bytes, but ike-scan does
                        not enforce this.
                        Specifying a large nonce length will increase the
                        size of the packet sent by ike-scan. A very large nonce
                        length may cause fragmentation, or exceed the maximum
                        IP packet size.
                        This option is only applicable to IKE aggressive mode.

--headerlen=<n> or -L <n> Set the length in the ISAKMP header to <n> bytes.
                        You can use this option to manually specify the value
                        to be used for the ISAKMP header length.
                        By default, ike-scan will fill in the correct value.
                        Use this option to manually specify an incorrect
                        length.
                        <n> can be specified as "+n" which sets the length
                        to n bytes more than it should be, "-n" which sets
                        it to n bytes less, or "n" which sets it to exactly
                        bytes.
                        Changing the header length to an incorrect value can
                        sometimes disrupt VPN servers.

--mbz=<n> or -Z <n>     Use the value <n> for reserved (MBZ) fields, default=0.
                        Specifying this option makes the outgoing packet
                        non-RFC compliant, and should only be used if you want
                        to see how a VPN server will respond to invalid packets.
                        The value of <n> should be in the range 0-255.

--headerver=<n> or -E <n> Specify the ISAKMP header version.
                        The default is 0x10 (16) which corresponds to v1.0.
                        Specifying a non-default value will make the outgoing
                        packet non-RFC compliant, and should only be used if
                        you want to see how the VPN server reacts to strange
                        versions.
                        The value should be in the range 0-255.

--certreq=<c> or -C <c> Add the CertificateRequest payload <c>.
                        <c> should be specified as a hex value.
                        The first byte of the hex value will be interpreted as
                        the certificate type; the remaining bytes as the
                        certificate authority as described in RFC 2408 3.10.
                        The certificate types are listed in RFC 2408 sec 3.9.
                        RFC 2048 states "The Certificate Request payload MUST
                        be accepted at any point during the exchange"

--doi=<d> or -D <d>     Set the SA DOI to <d>, default 1 (IPsec).
                        You will not normally want to change this unless you
                        want to see how the VPN server responds to a
                        non-standard DOI.

--situation=<s> or -S <s> Set the SA Situation to <d>, default 1.
                        The meaning of the situation depends on the DOI, and
                        is detailed in the appropriate DOI document.  For the
                        IPsec DOI, the default Situation of 1 represents
                        SIT_IDENTITY_ONLY.
                        You will not normally want to change this unless you
                        want to see how the VPN server responds to a
                        non-standard situation.

--protocol=<p> or -j <p> Set the Proposal protocol ID to <p>, default 1.
                        The meaning of the proposal protocol ID depends on
                        the DOI, and is detailed in the appropriate DOI
                        document.  For the IPsec DOI, the default proposal
                        protocol id of 1 represents PROTO_ISAKMP.
                        You will not normally want to change this unless you
                        want to see how the VPN server responds to a
                        non-standard protocol ID.

--transid=<t> or -k <t> Set the Transform ID to <t>, default 1.
                        The meaning of the transform ID depends on the
                        DOI, and is detailed in the appropriate DOI
                        document.  For the IPsec DOI, the default
                        transform id of 1 represents KEY_IKE.
                        You will not normally want to change this unless you
                        want to see how the VPN server responds to a
                        non-standard transform ID.

--spisize=<n>           Set the proposal SPI size to <n>.  Default=0
                        If this is non-zero, then a random SPI of the
                        specified size will be added to the proposal payload.
                        The default of zero means no SPI.

--hdrflags=<n>          Set the ISAKMP header flags to <n>.  Default=0
                        The flags are detailed in RFC 2408 section 3.1

--hdrmsgid=<n>          Set the ISAKMP header message ID to <n>.  Default=0
                        This should be zero for IKE Phase-1.

--cookie=<n>            Set the ISAKMP initiator cookie to <n>
                        The cookie value should be specified in hex.
                        By default, the cookies are automatically generated
                        and have unique values.  If you specify this option,
                        then you can only specify a single target, because
                        ike-scan requires unique cookie values to match up
                        the response packets.

--exchange=<n>          Set the exchange type to <n>
                        This option allows you to change the exchange type in
                        the ISAKMP header to an arbitrary value.
                        Note that ike-scan only supports Main and Aggressive
                        modes (values 2 and 4 respectively).  Specifying
                        other values will change the exchange type value in
                        the ISAKMP header, but will not adjust the other
                        payloads.
                        The exchange types are defined in RFC 2408 sec 3.1.

--nextpayload=<n>       Set the next payload in the ISAKMP header to <n>
                        Normally, the next payload is automatically set to the
                        correct value.

--randomseed=<n>        Use <n> to seed the pseudo random number generator.
                        This option seeds the PRNG with the specified number,
                        which can be useful if you want to ensure that the
                        packet data is exactly repeatable when it includes
                        payloads with random data such as key exchange or nonce.
                        By default, the PRNG is seeded with an unpredictable
                        value.

--timestamp             Display timestamps for received packets.
                        This option causes a timestamp to be displayed for
                        each received packet.

--sourceip=<s>          Set source IP address for outgoing packets to <s>.
                        This option causes the outgoing IKE packets to have
                        the specified source IP address.
                        The address can either be an IP address in dotted
                        quad format, or the string "random" which will use
                        a different random source address for each packet that
                        is sent.
                        If this option is used, no packets will be received
                        This option requires raw socket support, and you
                        will need superuser privileges to use this option,
                        even if you specify a high source port.
                        This option does not work on all operating systems.

--shownum               Display the host number for received packets.
                        This displays the ordinal host number of the
                        responding host before the IP address. It can be useful
                        when sending many packets to the same target IP, to
                        see if any probes are being ignored.

--nat-t                 Use RFC 3947 NAT-Traversal encapsulation.
                        This option adds the non-ESP marker to the beginning
                        of outgoing packets and strips it from received
                        packets, as described in RFC 3947. It also changes the
                        default source port to 4500 and the default destination
                        port to 4500, which are the ports for NAT-T IKE.
                        These port numbers can be changed with the --sport and
                        --dport options, providing they are used after the
                        --nat-t option.

--rcookie=<n>           Set the ISAKMP responder cookie to <n>.
                        This sets the responder cookie to the specified hex
                        value.  By default, the responder cookie is set to zero.

--ikev2 or -2           Use IKE version 2
                        This causes the outgoing packets to use IKEv2 format
                        as defined in RFC 4306 instead of the default IKEv1
                        format. Any packets returned are automatically decoded
                        as IKE or IKEv2 depending on their payloads irrespective
                        of this option.
                        The --ikev2 option is currently experimental. It has not
                        been extensively tested, and it only supports sending
                        the default proposal.

Report bugs or send suggestions to ike-scan@nta-monitor.com
See the ike-scan homepage at http://www.nta-monitor.com/tools/ike-scan/

Here is the version information for the ike-scan release that generated the help output.

$ ./ike-scan --version
ike-scan 1.9

Copyright (C) 2003-2007 Roy Hills, NTA Monitor Ltd.
ike-scan comes with NO WARRANTY to the extent permitted by law.
You may redistribute copies of ike-scan under the terms of the GNU
General Public License.
For more information about these matters, see the file named COPYING.

$Id: ike-scan.c 9884 2007-01-14 19:05:39Z rsh $
$Id: isakmp.c 9884 2007-01-14 19:05:39Z rsh $
$Id: error.c 9884 2007-01-14 19:05:39Z rsh $
$Id: utils.c 9884 2007-01-14 19:05:39Z rsh $
$Id: wrappers.c 9884 2007-01-14 19:05:39Z rsh $
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